Under the Paris Sky: My Trip to France - Part 3 Paris Residential Area (CORRECTED)

  •  
  • 437
  • 17
  • 3
  • English 
Jul 12, 2015 18:22
Continued from Part 2
As my accommodation was a bit of a walk from the station, I had a chance to explore the residential area of Paris.

With no power poles sticking out of the ground or power lines draping across the skyline, the streets looked neat and clean. Trees on the sidewalks provided comfortable shade. The buildings, slightly different in style to from each other, shared roughly the same height, which created a sense of unity. They had arrays of rectangular-shaped windows, whose sills were often adorned with red flowers. I wasn’t walking in the 16th arrondissement or any of the posh districts in Paris; it was just an ordinary residential area, but still, I had to stop to take pictures every now and then while walking to the station. They all looked chic and stylish and different from where I live.

However, not all were quite so beautiful. I had to be careful not to step in the dog doo I spotted here and there. I wouldn’t say there is no dog poop on the streets in Japan, but definitely not as much.

Streets ran irregularly, rarely parallel. Even with a map, I got lost multiple times and had to ask for directions.

Traffic was sparse but there were smaller traffic signals every few blocks. To me, accustomed to big and tall signals visible from 100 meters away, they looked like miniature traffic signals in a child’s playset. With simple straight poles, they stood about two meters high, painted in plain green or brown, with small signals attached. They looked simple and stylish.

Speaking of the traffic signals, I found that people in Paris, including tourists from all around the world, didn’t heed the traffic lights, when crossing the streets. What they did look out for was if there were any cars coming. (I don’t think such habits are specific to Paris. ) Anyway, it was something we don't do in Japan, where people usually wait for the traffic signal to change, even when they could run across the street. I often find myself tempted to do it the Parisian way in Tokyo.

Continued in Part 4: http://lang-8.com/997612/journals/174479134850181038392691839207709345824
(This journal has been corrected and revised.)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Original before correction:
Continued from Part 2
As my accommodation was a little distant from the station, I had a chance to see a residential area of Paris.

With no electric poles and cables on the ground, the streets looked neat and clean. Trees on the pedestrian streets were providing comfortable shades. The architectures, slightly different in style each other, shared around the same height, which created a sense of unity. They had arrays of rectangular-shaped windows, often adorned with red flowers. I wasn’t walking in the 16th arrondissement or any posh districts in Paris; it was just one of those residential areas, but still, I had to stop to take pictures every now and then while walking to the station. They all looked chic and stylish and different from where I live.

However, not all were beautiful. I had to be careful not to step on dog poops spotted here and there. I wouldn’t say we have no dog poops on the streets in Japan, but definitely not as many.

Streets were running irregularly, hardly parallel. Even with a map, I got lost multiple times and had to ask for directions.

Traffic was sparse but there were smaller traffic signals at every few blocks. To me, accustomed to big and tall signals visible 100 meters away, they looked like miniature traffic signals in the kids land. A simple straight pole, about two meter high, painted in plain green or brown, had a small signal attached. It looked simple and stylish.

Speaking of the traffic signals, I found that people in Paris, including tourists from all around the world, didn’t see the traffic signals, when crossing the streets. What they saw was if there were any cars coming. (I don’t think such habits are specific to Paris. ) Anyway, it was something we don't do in Japan, where people usually wait for the traffic signal to change, even when they could run and cross the street. I often find myself tempted to exercise the Parisian way in Tokyo.

Continued in Part 4: http://lang-8.com/997612/journals/174479134850181038392691839207709345824
パリの空の下ーフランス旅行記 パート3
パート2から続き

宿泊先は駅からやや遠かったため、パリの住宅街を見る機会を得ることができた。

電柱や電線がなく道路はすっきりとした印象だった。歩道の街路樹が心地よい木陰をつくっていた。建築物はそれぞれ少しずつスタイルが違っていたが、高さはほぼ同じに揃えられており、統一感を生み出していた。それらの建物には縦長の窓が整列して並び、あちらこちらの窓に赤い花が飾られていた。私が歩いていたのは、パリの16区といった高級住宅街ではない。普通の住宅街の一つであった。それでも、駅まで歩く途中写真をとるために立ち止ることがよくあった。スタイリッシュで上品で、私が住んでいる町の住宅街とはまったく違っていた。

しかしすべてが美しいわけではなかった。あちこちに犬の糞が落ちているので注意して歩かねばならなかった。「日本の道路に犬の糞は落ちていない」とは言わないが、パリほど多くないことだけは確かだ。

道は不規則に伸び、並行した道路はほとんどなかった。地図を持っているのに何度も道に迷い、道を尋ねた回数は数知れない。

車はほとんど通らないが数ブロックおきに小さな信号があった。100メートル先からでも見える日本の大きな信号に見慣れている私にとって、それらの小さな信号機はは、まるで子供の国のミニチュア信号のように見えた。緑または茶色で塗られた高さ2メートルほどのポールの先に、小さな信号が取り付けられている。シンプルでスタイリッシュだった。

信号と言えば、世界中からの旅行者も含めパリの人々は道路を渡る際、信号機を見てはいなかった。人々が見ていたのは車が来ているかどうかだった。(このような習慣はパリに限らないと思う。)とにかく、日本とは違った。日本では信号が変わるまで立ち止まって待っているのが普通だ。走って渡ろうと思えば渡れるときであってもだ。帰国した後も、東京でパリのやり方をやりたくなってしまう。

パート4に続く:http://lang-8.com/997612/journals/174479134850181038392691839207709345824