Four years now since Japan’s unprecedented triple disasters- 2/2 (CORRECTED)

  •  
  • 421
  • 11
  • 4
  • English 
Mar 12, 2015 00:00
Continued from 1/2
Then there were the explosions of the nuclear reactors. I remember a cabinet member of the Democratic Party of Japan, the ruling party at that time, donning a brand new factory-worker-like blue uniform and repeating something like “The situation is under control,” every time he appeared on TV.

I didn't believe it. The scene of the smoke coming out of the reactor was ominous enough. It was not under control at all. The severity of the accident was later rated 7, the highest level and the same as the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

As of today, nearly 120,000 residents of Fukushima who lived near the nuclear power plant are still displaced. They now live in other areas in Fukushima or other prefectures. Some areas close to the plant are designated as exclusion zones, where people aren't allowed to live.

Currently in Japan, no nuclear power plants are in operation. There are 48 operable nuclear reactors at 16 plants across the country. As of today, four reactors at two power plants have passed more stringent safety checks. But the time they will resume operations is undecided. In a Mainichi Shimbun’s survey conducted in January, 54% of respondents said they were against operations resuming.

For a while after the disaster, we had some inconveniences in Tokyo, such as reduced operation of trains, scarcity of some foods on store shelves, limited use of electricity, and so on. But those were really minor, compared to what people in the disaster-hit areas experienced. As of today, 18,475 people have been confirmed dead or missing due to the earthquake and tsunami. And more than 3000 people have died from disaster-related causes afterwards.

Today, many people across Japan observed a moment of silence at the time when the earthquake struck. And there were a number of special programs dedicated to the fourth anniversary of the disaster.

I was unable to cover a positive side of the recovery as I prepared this entry in haste. I wanted and also felt that I needed to write something for this day.

Though the pace isn't so fast, the recovery is in progress. Please keep watching Japan.

There are some current pictures of the tsunami-hit areas and the progress of recovery on the special site, Google’s “Memory for Future” project:
https://www.miraikioku.com/2015.html

Thank you for reading.
(This entry has already been corrected and revised.)

Back to 1/2:http://lang-8.com/997612/journals/333490472854804543099225089261015338090
東日本大震災から4年 パート1からの続き
そして福島第一原発で原子炉が爆発した。当時の与党であった民主党の幹事長が、真新しい青色の作業着を着て、記者会見の度に「事態は統制下にある」といったようなことを繰り返していたのを覚えている。

私はそれを全く信じていなかった。原子炉から白い煙がモクモクと上がる様子を遠景からとらえたシーンは不吉そのものだった。実際、後になって事故の深刻度は1986年のチェルノブイリ原発事故と同等の最高レベル7だとされた。

今日現在、いまだに原発近辺に住んでいた12万人近い福島県民が自宅に帰ることができずに県内の別の地域や県外で暮らしている。原発に近い一部の地区は居住が許されない立ち入り禁止地区に指定されている。

現在日本では原発は一基も稼働していない。国内には16ヵ所の原発に48基の原子炉が存在している。今のところ、2ヵ所の原発の4基の原子炉が再稼働のためのより厳しい検査に合格している。しかし、実際の再稼働がいつになるかはわからない。毎日新聞が1月に行った調査によると、54%の人が原発の再稼働は反対だと答えている。

震災後しばらくは東京でも、電車の運転本数の削減、スーパーで一部の食料品の不足、電力使用制限などの不便に見舞われた。しかしこれらはどれも、被災地の人々が被った被害に比べれば全く取るに足らない問題だった。今日現在、死者・行方不明者は18,475人に上り、3000人以上が震災後の関連死で亡くなっている。

今日、日本各地で地震発生の時刻に合わせて黙とうが捧げられた。また、テレビでは震災から4年の節目を特集する番組が多く放送された。

急いで書いたため復興など前向きな点について述べることができなかった。この日のために何かを書きたく、また書く必要がある気がしてこの投稿を書いた。

ゆっくりとではあるが復興は進んでいる。どうかこれからも日本を見続けて欲しい。

Googleの「未来のキオク」プロジェクトのサイトで、津波の被災地の現在の様子や復興の進捗を見ることができる。
https://www.miraikioku.com/2015.html

読んでくださってありがとうございました。