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tony
  • He was a man of responsibility, and was kind and very strict for the job.
  • He was a man of responsibility, and was kind, but very strict about his job.
  • I changed "and" to "but" because the words "kind" and "strict" suggest a contrast.

Feb 19, 2016 15:54 Public My Ex Chinese Boss
tony
  • There was a Chinese boss when I was working at a travel agency.
  • I had a Chinese boss when I was working at a travel agency. [Alternative: When I was working at a travel agency, my boss was Chinese. When I was working at a travel agency, one of my bosses was Chinese.]
  • Use "one of my bosses" only if you had more than one boss at that travel agency.

Feb 19, 2016 15:54 Public My Ex Chinese Boss
tony
  • My Ex Chinese Boss
  • My Chinese Ex-Boss [Alternative: My Former Boss Who Was Chinese]
  • "Ex" is not a word by itself; it is only a prefix. (Actually, "ex" is sometimes meant to mean a person who you used to be married to, but have divorced. That is a colloquial usage.)

Feb 19, 2016 15:54 Public My Ex Chinese Boss
tony
  • Because we could not know the ending from this novel, we have to imagine by ourselves.
  • Because the novel doesn't tell us the ending, we have to imagine it for ourselves.

Jan 13, 2016 15:47 Public A book report
tony
  • The gist of the story is that a guy who happens to be in love with a daughter of a king is going to have to choose a door of two, which is to die for a tiger or to live with a beautiful girl to live happily.
  • The gist of the story is that a guy who happens to be in love with a daughter of a king is going to have to choose one of two doors. Behind one is a tiger who will kill him, and behind the other is a beautiful woman with whom he will live happily. [Alternative: If he chooses one, a tiger will kill him; if he chooses the other, he will live happily with the {king's daughter | princess}.]
  • "a door ... which is to die ... or to live" doesn't make sense; it says that it is the door which will die or live, not the man.

Jan 13, 2016 12:25 Public A book report
tony
No. "Winter in Japan is very cold, but in contrast, winter in Australia is warm." "Some people think that winter in Japan is warm, but on the contrary, it is very cold." The difference between the two sentences is the difference between...

Jan 13, 2016 12:23 Public I like warm climates.
tony
In sentences where you use a verb or adjective phrase to modify a following noun in Japanese, you will usually need to use a relative clause in English. 私が書いた本 = a/the book that I wrote ギターを弾いている人 = a/the person who is playing a guit...

Jan 13, 2016 12:22 Public I like warm climates.
tony
  • Needless to say, I like summer lasting countries.
  • Needless to say, I like countries where summer lasts (a long time).

Jan 13, 2016 12:21 Public I like warm climates.
tony
  • But to the contrary, I like winter in Australia due to its warm weather.
  • {In contrast | On the other hand}, I like winter in Australia because it is warm.
  • "To the contrary" means that you are contradicting your previous statement. That is not the case. Your previous statement is still true; you are making another statement which contrasts with it.

Jan 13, 2016 12:21 Public I like warm climates.
tony
Yes. "Is attributed to" is a perfectly good phrase; it is not what you mean. "X is attributed to Y" means that someone-- not the person speaking or writing the sentence-- claims that Y is the cause of X. Here, you are the person who is c...

Jan 13, 2016 12:19 Public The World's Problem

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